Radon Inspections

Radon Inspections in Cincinnati, Ohio

Exposure to radon in the home is responsible for an estimated 20,000 lung cancer deaths each year. It is for this reason, that it is very important to get your home inspected.

Radon comes from the natural (radioactive) breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water and gets into the air you breathe. Radon can be found all over the U.S. It can get into any type of building — homes, offices, and schools — and result in a high indoor radon level. But you and your family are most likely to get your greatest exposure at home, where you spend most of your time.

Testing is the only way to know if you and your family are at risk from radon. EPA and the Surgeon General recommend testing all homes below the third floor for radon.

Any home may have a radon problem. Radon is a radioactive gas. It comes from the natural decay of uranium that is found in nearly all soils. It typically moves up through the ground to the air above and into your home through cracks and other holes in the foundation. Your home traps radon inside, where it can build up. Any home may have
a radon problem. This means new and old homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, and homes with or without basements.

Radon gas decays into radioactive particles that can get trapped in your lungs when you breathe. As they break down further, these particles release small bursts of energy. This can damage lung tissue and lead to lung cancer over the course of your lifetime. Not everyone exposed to elevated levels of radon will develop lung cancer. And the amount of time between exposure and the onset of the disease may be many years.

Nearly 1 out of every 15 homes in the U.S. is estimated to have elevated radon levels. Elevated levels of radon gas have been found in homes in your state. While radon problems may be more common in some areas, any home may have a problem. The only way to know about your home is to test.

At AVHI, our certified home inspectors use highly accurate and sophisticated electronic radon monitors that are placed in the home for 48 hours and measure the radon levels over that time frame. The EPA sets the threshold or action level. If the readings are higher than 4.0 pCi/L, mitigation is recommended.

There are several proven methods to reduce radon in your home, but the one primarily used is a vent pipe system and fan, which pulls radon from beneath the house and vents it to the outside. This system, known as a soil suction radon reduction system, does not require major changes to your home. Sealing foundation cracks and other openings makes this kind of system more effective and cost-efficient. Similar systems can also be installed in houses with crawl spaces. Radon contractors can use other

methods that may also work in your home. The right system depends on the design of your home and other factors.